Mother on the Orient Express: Part Two

Did I mention that seconds after Mom showed me her dead cell phone, I found her boarding pass on the floor of the restaurant?

This is when I confiscated all of her travel documents, and would not let her have them in her possession… until we ended up in a fight while being forced to go through customs in Canada.

”Canada!” you say. “But I thought you guys were going to Europe!

Yes, dear reader. Thank you for paying attention. I will tell you all about Canada, but not until later, because right now in this story Mom and I are still trying to get out of Newark. Continue reading

It’s Not That Scary: The Guatemala Stories (Part Four)

tampons/pamprin

I really wrote all of that stuff before so I could tell you this, my favorite story from the trip.

Okay, look. We’ve been through a lot together, you guys. So here is where I tell you that I was two hours into the road trip to Solola, at a gas station in the middle of nowhere, in a caravan where I still hadn’t learned everybody’s name, when I got my period. Continue reading

It’s Not That Scary: The Guatemala Stories (Part Three)

baseball cap / bandanas / combat boots

Despite my fall, I was dressed rather appropriately for the amount of hiking and manual labor that was ahead of us. At one point we were met by one of the Good Neighbors Guatemala staff, a tiny Korean girl named Genesis, who was in skinny jeans, a scarf, boots with heels, and other fancy clothes. I admired her ability to dart around the dirt floors, carry cinder blocks, and take down notes in ball point pen on the palm of her hand so that she can help with a future installation of a cookstove. Continue reading

It’s Not That Scary: The Guatemala Stories (Part One)

“You’ve only known these people for a week?! Pam, you are so brave!”

“Some would call it ‘crazy.’”

Even saying I’d known my traveling partners for a week was being a bit generous. We’d had two meetings over that week, and a few frantic emails on my end. Total amount of time I’d known these people before I left the country with them: about three hours. Continue reading