Notes to Boys (And Other Things I Shouldn’t Share in Public) — Now in Paperback!

Notes to Boys PB cover

Hello Giggles Item of the Day

One of The Hairpin‘s “15 books to read now”

“…what makes the book so good is that Grown-up Pam has enormous affection for Little Pam, who is, like a little sister, horribly embarrassing on the one hand and a fiercely protected loved one on the other. It’s a collection of embarrassing stories and mortifying notes, yes, but it’s also a pretty deeply felt memoir about her introduction to boys and sex and—perhaps most painfully—learning when not to tell people how you feel.”
—Linda Holmes, NPR Monkey See and NPR’s Pop Culture Happy Hour

Miserably trapped in small town Texas with no invention of the internet in sight, Pamela Ribon spent countless hours of her high school years writing letters to her (often unrequited) crushes. The big question is: why did she always keep a copy for herself?

Come for the incredibly bad poetry, stay for the incredibly bad poetry about racism.

Buy your copy at Amazon, Powells, or contact your local independent bookstore.

Also available in hardcover … or an unforgettably long day with me if you buy the audiobook!

“…I enjoyed the book, and I rooted for [Little Pam]…hang around for the payoff.”
—Tiffany Turpin Johnson, LitReactor

Book Giveaway! Recipes for Disaster by Tess Rafferty

My friend Tess writes jokes that probably already made you laugh. She spent years writing for The Soup, worked on roasts for Comedy Central, and now has a new book that perfectly captures the difficulties in maintaining perfect hostess calm while entertaining your drunk-ass friends.

I have been one of these drunk-ass friends on more than one occasion, and I’m almost positive none of my antics made it into this book. And that is a little shocking because I have had some moments in this lady’s backyard, including the morning I let myself into her pool at the same minute she opened her curtains while fully naked. Good morning! [I still promise I saw nothing!] Read more

“Super cute script, girl.”

I was driving home from a features meeting yesterday listening to Scriptnotes, a podcast by Craig Mazin and John August. If you are an aspiring screenwriter and you haven’t found Scriptnotes yet, I highly encourage it. Craig plays the cranky rich guy who grumbles when a screenwriter finds this job hard while John soothes with his kind voice and gentle encouragement. I think it’s the kind of balance you need inside your brain if screenwriting is the kind of thing you want to do to your life. (“Oh, just shut up and write, you whiny baby! …and good luck, you can do it!”)

Lately Craig and John have been taking a few minutes out of their podcast to ponder why there are so few women in this industry. As a woman who had just taken two general meetings that day in features, slammed in the middle a week of no less than five TV sitcom pitches, I wanted to shout back, “I’M TRYING, GUYS.” Craig and John gave some stats based off their own recent inquiry for submissions — only 12% of the writers who sent them pages were female — and with less than a third of Nicholl submissions coming from women and only around a quarter of working screenwriters with the Guild being female, they eventually somewhat concluded: “I guess they just aren’t as interested.” And then I got really bummed out. Read more

Hey, Pamie: “How Do You Start Writing A Novel?”

I have a new editor on this new manuscript. I was nervous for the past few weeks knowing that the manuscript was on her to-read-and-edit pile. It was like I’d changed schools, got a new teacher, and wanted to find out if I was still considered a good student.

I got an A!

Karen only had good things to say about the manuscript and I’m quite relieved. She gave me notes to incorporate after we receive the copyedits, and the book is still on track to be released July 2012.

I’m incredibly nervous about it, which is how I’ve felt right before the release date of each of my novels, so it’s probably getting close to the right shape. Right when I think, “I can’t let anyone see this. It’s extremely personal. I’m going to tell them never mind and let’s just stop this right now.” that’s about the time I need someone like my editor to go, “Too late! We’ve sent it off to the printers. What’s your next one about?”

And segue right into this week’s Writerly Advice Weekly Procrastination Thing. Read more