Pre-order Info for You Take It From Here

Did you know you can now pre-order my new novel? Did you know that pre-ordering is helpful to me? It means things to people like my publishers, who make all the big decisions on what happens to this book and any future books.

So if you like things I write (as much as I like you (I really like you, you know that, right?)), then please think about buying yourself your first summertime present. YOU TAKE IT FROM HERE comes out July 3rd, and I’ll share the cover with you as soon as I can, but for now, here’s the pre-order info.

From the author of Why Girls Are Weird comes a poignant, funny tale about two very different best friends—one terminally ill with cancer, and the other determined to do absolutely everything she can to help.

Practical, patient Danielle Meyers escaped her small Southern hometown as quickly as possible, landing herself in sunny Los Angeles as a successful homemaking consultant and recent divorcee. Her bossy, loud, impulsive best friend Smidge stayed behind in Ogden, Louisiana, and has succeeded quite soundly—wife, mother, karaoke superstar, social butterfly, and survivor of cancer. But when Smidge and Danielle reunite for their annual girls’ vacation, Smidge reveals that the cancer is back and terminal, and Danielle vows to do anything to make the last bit of Smidge’s life easier. Expecting her best friend to make such a promise, Smidge has just one request: for Danielle to take over Smidge’s family after she dies. Move back to Ogden to be a wife to her husband, and finish raising her daughter — a plan she demands they must keep secret. When the friend you love “the mostest” wants you to make her last wish come true, are you allowed to say no?

GALLERY BOOKS
PUB DATE: July 3, 2012, trade paperback and e-book.

Buy it here from Amazon for your nightstand or Kindle.
Don’t want to buy from Amazon? Simon and Schuster has more choices here.

I hope you enjoy it. This is my pre-thank you thank you.

Making it Work While You’re Mostly Working for Free

I’m waiting on the phone to ring to find out about a project I pitched yesterday while simultaneously scheduling a pitch meeting around another pitch meeting I already have set, one that is effectively killing my original plans to attend a friend’s wedding, which leads me to answering an excellent question about money with a whole lot of words on juggling multiple projects.

Heidi writes in the comments section of this entry:

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If I may ask a question about the super secret fantasy life of a writer — how do you budget financially during the jags where you’re working flat out for free until you can catch your breath and the unexpected income arrives? …I’ve found my own 1099 income years to be sort of jarring, so I wondered.
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I’m sure there are many ways to do this. Unfortunately, I am not blessed with the “Rich Uncle” version, so I had to go about it differently.

My very first day of my very first tv show job, one of the more established writers said to me, “Save your money, kid.” He didn’t have to do that. I’m pretty sure I didn’t ask for any advice at all. Because of that, I thought, “That man is telling me something he wishes someone had said to him. He is literally trying to pay it backward.” So I do try to always save, particularly when I’m on a show that’s paying me every week. I put a lot of that away, knowing it’s my paycheck when I’m not staffed or waiting on a check from all my other writing, which pays about maybe four times a year.

Making it work while you’re working for free takes some discipline, some planning, and still a bit of luck. But it can happen!

If I’d been fortunate enough to be on a show that lasted more than a couple of seasons, I could tell you, “Residuals.” That’s one of the reasons we were striking so hard those few years ago.

Samantha Who? still plays in other countries, and is on Netflix streaming, so every once in a while a “little green envelope” comes in the mail from the Writer’s Guild that is my tiny cut of that pie. A very, very tiny cut. My last LGE was for around three hundred dollars, after taxes. I might get another one next year for less than that. But that show wasn’t on for very long, and I wasn’t at producer level. Someone more established on a show that lasts four seasons or five or is on multiple networks — those residuals keep you going during the times when you aren’t on staff, when you are “working flat out for free.”

But that’s not me, either. I’m going to try to answer your question with the four rules I keep in mind when I’m doing this job.
Read more

Putting Me Out There

In case you were coming here looking for a collection of my Valentines Day Poems: The best place to go is here.

As you read this, Glark is hard at work, tirelessly attempting to wrangle the beast that is pamie.com into something that can reload with dignity. After looking through thirteen years of file dumping, he has declared me the Hoarder of the Internet. He has a small point. Anyway, I’m very excited about unleashing a pretty, sparkly version of this site in the near future. Read more

mostly i’m just wigging out here.

Yesterday’s entry brought some good email/comments from you guys.

[readermail]I love that you’re taking your mom on the Orient Express. I cannot wait to read all about it. Maybe you should write a book. In fact, I command you to! Besides, it would make a way better movie than Eat, Pray, Love and Meryl Streep can play your mom and Patricia Arquette can play you. Perfect. There, I’ve cast it. Now, you just have to write the book! Start now! Hee.

Hope you’re well.

xo
Tamara
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I get told just about every time I mention this trip to someone new, “Well, I look forward to whatever you end up writing about that.” But this is the first time someone went ahead and cast it. Read more